'Balloon Boy | Limited Edition' by Lisa Grennell at Quirky Fox

Balloon Boy | Limited Edition

Lisa Grennell

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This limited edition acrylic screenprint on perspex by Lisa Grennell shows a young boy with his teddy holding a heart-shaped balloon. 

The almost scribble-like technique in which Lisa has created the teddy and boy transcends age, race and physical characteristics: the featured child could be anyone's child or grandchild.

Year: 2020

Dimensions: 300mm (dia)

Medium:Acrylic screenprint on perspex

Edition Size: 20

Quirky Fox: Art + Framing

Lisa Grennell moved back to her home country from Australia 15 years ago to raise her 3 children. Now living on the South Island in rural Glenhope, Lisa’s studio sits high on a hill surrounded by 42 acres of pasture and native forest. She has chosen a more simplistic lifestyle with solar and wind turbine for power and natural streams and rain for water, Lisa feels her art is stripped to a more simplistic aesthetic.

“I am at the mercy of nature, I now live my art”.

Lisa exhibits locally, nationally and internationally.

With her own personal journey raising children as inspiration, she draws from nostalgic moments in an attempt to alleviate the solace of ‘the empty nest’. Lisa uses the imagery of children with flowers, animals and insects questioning young people’s view of the world, seeing a disconnection from nature with modern technology.

“I often wonder what the future holds for following generations. I question whether my grandchildren will ever experience the majestic beauty of nature or will it be an app on the latest iPhone.”

Lisa emphasizes this with her use of large white vacant space, creating a cavity to which her subjects float, this is the artist’s expression of the uncertainty of our future; it cannot be foreseen.

She also likes to involve the viewer into the work via the reflective surface. By looking/reading the gaze is returned, the spectator becomes the narrative and in turn, part of the problem and solution.